For those that have been around since our beginnings, Flowland started as "Flowland Hemporium" in 2000, carrying clothes, food, and material made from Industrial Hemp (grown internationally at the time). Industrial hemp is defined by federal law as a plant of the genus Cannabis Sativa, grown in accordance with state agriculture departments, with a level of THC less than 0.3%... so it can't get you high, but it does have a multitude of other uses from the use of it's fiber, seeds, and flower.  You can purchase food made from hemp high in protein and Omega 3,6, and 9; CBD oil made from hemp for use for general health and wellness applications; "hempcrete" used in the construction of house; and many more applications.   While Flowland's product offerings have expanded past those made from hemp, we've never lost sight of our initial mission, and that was to educate the public on the many uses of this wonderful plant. In 2018 and beyond, as more North Carolina goods made from hemp become available, it is our plan to offer more of these products (as we were about 17 years before our time when we first opened).  We are excited to see the possibilities this holds for our farmers, and our local economies, as this cash crop begins to show it's true potential.

"The 113th Congress made significant changes to U.S. policies regarding industrial hemp during the omnibus farm bill debate. The Agricultural Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-79) provided that certain research institutions and state departments of agriculture may grow industrial hemp, as part of an agricultural pilot program, if allowed under state laws where the institution or state department of agriculture is located. The FY2015 appropriations (P.L. 113-235) further blocked federal law enforcement authorities from interfering with state agencies, growers, and agricultural research. (From "Hemp as an agricultural commodity," Congressional Research Service)

Hemp production has been legalized in North Carolina, but only as part of the state's pilot program as allowed under federal law. As such, it will still be awhile before the first fields are planted (update: the first hemp plots were planted in harvested in the Summer of 2017). The N.C. General Assembly passed Senate Bill 313 in 2015, allowing the Industrial Hemp Commission to develop the rules and licensing structure necessary to stay within federal laws. The law was modified in 2016 in House Bill 992. The Industrial Hemp Commission adopted temporary rules for review in February 2017. The Rules Review Commission of the Office of Administrative Hearings voted to approve these rules Feb. 16."  Source:  www.ncagr.gov/hemp/